Asemic Westerns

asemic-pioneer-western-wilderness-voyageurs

Wilderness Voyageurs in the woods know Asemic Westerns.

 

Range stop, The Sage Westward, the desert wind writes the Westerns in the darkness, while the Campfire Riders from Stalk Lake were whipped Frozen. That’s what it takes to live in the Land of Blood Wind, just North of the Lonesome Pines.

At Bisection, The Bringers of Cows twisted in the air. It was that time of year. Near the Volkswagen Gultchy , we in sage brush shadows, now like pine trees by a sun-baked waste, let the thieves into the camp.

 

asemic-western-the-ranch-of-the-cow-bringers

 

Wilderness was too near purple, with trails vast in the darkest.  Westward, The Last of The Plainsmen, moved through icy fog to Blood and Glory – all the giant trees hid the open sky, made that afternoon resplendence in boon hocks. I knew, in that woods-horse farmhouse by the trees, the outlook was magnificent and sublime beyond words – there are no words, when meaning splashes on rocks. The village was cold chromatic, in a clump, like amethyst button holes . I knew, then came the giants, stones riding whispers.

 

asemic-western-the-land-of-thieves

 

I sleep on twisted trails by the campfire, while Riders of the Purple Sage sing in saloons . Motown Boogie hunted with the wolves and the calliopes. There were no words left in the street or among the ponies and peonies, just the meowing of pekingese and pancreas enzymes. It was the darkest evening of the year in the Land of Thieves. Time to pack iron and polka, because we will always have Paris.

 

Notes: Pioneer Western Issue # 1 1937 August cover image found here.

Cowboys in front of small house with thatch roof on ranch –  ca. 1900

Part Of: Lawrence T. Jones III Texas photography collection -DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University

The Land of Thieves from page 1075 of “Moving Picture News (1911)”

Asemic text elements created from photos of pages of Tangled Trails 1934 by Roy Norton .

Prose Poem : Meaning  tries to regain control through tropes, and codes & conventions of vocabulary, syntax, narrative structure, and genre.

 

 

 

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “Asemic Westerns

  1. Wow! Your wordy rhetoric throws my logical mind-flow through loops of non-understanding, even when I try hard to make sense of your creative endeavour. “Motown Boogie hunted with the wolves and the calliopes.” You’re in a different world of semantics that I find easy to relate to, but I do enjoy your images.

    1. Asemic writing is all about the breakdown of meaning and the imposition of meaning/patterning on chaotic systems/patterns. While looking up information on Asemic visual art, I came across
      Asymptote is a premier site for world literature in translation. It includes visual art and a number of non-fiction pieces about asemic works . The site really helped me develop some ideas for an accompanying text for the visuals and provide some ideas for further exploration.

      http://www.asymptotejournal.com/

      While working on the visuals for Asemic Westerns, I dug deep in modifying text. moving individual letters, words and phrases around. What I noticed was how my brain kept trying to unscramble the text and impose meaning. When we read, we actually use minimal distinctive features to help us interpret and predict the messages contained in the text. The more familiar we are with the text ( accomplished readers), the easier it is to make predictions and anticipate meaning. People we reading disabilities have a problem doing this task. In effect the text in the visuals lets an capable reader experience the struggle that those with varying degrees of dyslexia face on a regular basis.

      The prose poem is intended to subvert the expectations of the reader in a similar fashion to the asemic visuals. The tropes and phrasing suggests a typical western narrative, but the anachronistic word choices and poetic images turn the expectations on their head.

      Hyperlinks will take you to actual westerns; “the outlook was magnificent and sublime beyond words” comes directly from Zane Grey’s The Last of The Plainsmen.

      Some readers will find it a bit confusing, others will see it as satirical Dadaist view of the American Myth of the rugged individual taming the Wild West. A powerful myth, the current American laws and cultural divisiveness over the rights to bear arms derives from the conviction in that myth.

      I hope my blog posts bring you entertainment and interest without them becoming too abstract and annoying. 😉 This blog rests between my photo blog and my media literacy blog. The creative ideas and philosophical meanderings, that do not fit easily into the other two, come come to rest here. 😀

      1. Thank-you for the lengthy explanation. Now I understand why I felt like the confused reader. My expectations were definitely subverted. Ha ha! Yes, your blog posts are both entertaining and spark my curiosity to unravel their meaning, but this one just lost me in a twilight zone of confusion. Hope you have a creative and lovely week-end! 🙂

      2. Just glad my response made sense and helped put things into a context. 😀

        I have global approach to ideas and my background as both a Media Literacy and Special Education teacher tends to collide in some of my creative projects. I will use the the visuals and the attempts at poetic expression to explore the connections, that to me seem obvious – the rest of world my wonder what I am going on and on about. 😀

        BTW I reside in Elliot Lake. If you check my photo blog – https://darkpinesphoto.wordpress.com/ – you will find lots of Northern Ontario photos, as well as other nonsense. 😀

    1. Many thanks.
      For some reason, I now have this thought of Little House on the Prairie being redone in the cinematic style of Hitchcock. Maybe we could get Lady Gaga for the role of the mother. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s