Asemic Postcards from Lesser Known Hotels 2

As waves perambulated towards the white sands of the toasted beach, we strolled down the boardwalk viewing the hotels & sun bathers, little expecting the chain of circumstances that were about to descend on all of us from those green misted hills. Looking back at it all, the sun drenched mayhem was a cool dip in blue waters & laughter, to be treasured with the frantic postcards sent to folks at home.

 

Postcard messages –

layered lines of joy ‘n dread sink;

such sweet memories.

Another minuscule mystery haibun in the manner of Claudia McGill.

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Cash 4 YOUr POVerty

cash 4 YOU!

cash 4 YOU TOO !

cash 4 YOU $$ TRUE –

cash 4 YOUr POVerty………

cash 4 YOUr POVerty

cash 4 YOUr POV $$-erty !

Ka$$$h 4 YOUr POVerty

Kra$$$$h – 4 YOUr  POV  $$-erty>>>>>>

 

just casshhh 4 YOUr POVerty RIGHT NOW !

 

Received the Cash 4 You junk mail the other day. Some of these quick loan businesses can be just this side of shady; all of them exist in a morally grey area by taking advantage of how many hard working people are stuck paying bills. It is very easy to slip into poverty, even here in Canada ( See online: the why poverty series of mini-documentaries on TVO ). Here in Ontario, Doug Ford’s Conservative government stopped the pilot project for guaranteed income before the results were in. The previous federal conservative government, under Stephen Harper, had shut down a federal project in the Yukon in the same manner.

All this makes you wonder, “why poverty”.

Time Flux photo portrait – Caryatid

flux photo – portrait,

Time Flux Photo – Portrait Time,

Time’s fleeting arrow,

in flux,

forms a portrait:

 

Caryatid.

Effigy

Effigy.

Close up

Close up.

Miniatures

Miniatures.

 

Abergavenny abstract –

Arches.

Bad neighbours

Building –

Design Doors Gate.

Good neighbours

Landscape Miscellany.

nature Pillar Portals

Reblog Reflections

 

Sculpture shadows,

Signs Skyline,

skyscape Stone heads.

Storage Street life – Uncategorized vista,

Walk water Whimsy Window.

Sources & Inspiration

 

To begin with, how I came to be running amok with Caryatids and other imagery – it is Christopher Lovegrove’s fault. Chris has two blogs, Calmgrove (Literature & Culture) and My New Shy (photography) . While checking out some of his recent photography posts, I was in the process of commenting on the post, Caryatid, when I noticed that the list of blog categories formed a set of imagist lines, found poetry.

I set out to copy the words & construct a sequence, I ended up acquiring some extra text from the blog post. For some reason, these words doubled up, a Dadaist gift.  I had recently posted one of my visual pieces on Twitter, “flux – portrait “, and hashtag title set off the opening lines of this piece. Besides incorporating a screen capture from Chis’ post, I reworked a number of own compositions to illustrate the lines. I also used some images from Flikr Commons  

Arc de Diane, Cahors- 1891

pg 198 – The general catalogue of Jacobson-co (1915)

Abergavenny, Holy Mountain 1890 – 1900.

Female Caryatid statue -Henry Hering 1919

 

Reflections on The Lady of Shalott

But in her web she still delights
To weave the mirror’s magic sights,
For often thro’ the silent nights
A funeral, with plumes and lights
       And music, came from Camelot:
Or when the moon was overhead
Came two young lovers lately wed;
‘I am half sick of shadows,’ said
       The Lady of Shalott.

She left the web, she left the loom
She made three paces thro’ the room
She saw the water-flower bloom,
She saw the helmet and the plume,
       She look’d down to Camelot.
Out flew the web and floated wide;
The mirror crack’d from side to side;
‘The curse is come upon me,’ cried
       The Lady of Shalott.

Under tower and balcony,
By garden-wall and gallery,
A gleaming shape she floated by,
Dead-pale between the houses high,
       Silent into Camelot.
Out upon the wharfs they came,
Knight and burgher, lord and dame,
And round the prow they read her name,
       The Lady of Shalott.
Who is this? and what is here?
And in the lighted palace near
Died the sound of royal cheer;
And they cross’d themselves for fear,
       All the knights at Camelot:
But Lancelot mused a little space;
He said, “She has a lovely face;
God in his mercy lend her grace,
       The Lady of Shalott.”
They cross’d themselves, their stars they blest,
Knight, minstrel, abbot, squire, and guest.
There lay a parchment on her breast,
That puzzled more than all the rest,
       The wellfed wits at Camelot.
‘The web was woven curiously,
The charm is broken utterly,
Draw near and fear not,—this is I,
       The Lady of Shalott.’