Confirmation of Beliefs

Former US leader, Barack Obama, quotes nelson Mandela  in a series of tweets as a response to the Saturday attacks in Charlottesville,…… “No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin, they can be taught to love. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love. For love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.” – Nelson Mandela.

President Trump’s first comments came Saturday from his golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey, – “this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides.”

 

Kant believed that reason dictates a categorical imperative for moral action.

Act so that you treat humanity, whether in your own person or in that of another, always as an end and never as a means only.”

 

Socrates infuriates Polus with the argument that it is better to suffer an injustice than commit one (Gorgias 475a-d).  Polus agrees that it is more shameful to commit an injustice, but maintains it is not worse.  The worst thing, in his view, is to suffer injustice.  Socrates argues that, if something is more shameful, it surpasses in either badness or pain or both.  Since committing an injustice is not more painful than suffering one, committing an injustice cannot surpass in pain or both pain and badness.  Committing an injustice surpasses suffering an injustice in badness; differently stated, committing an injustice is worse than suffering one.  Therefore, given the choice between the two, we should choose to suffer rather than commit an injustice.

This argument must be understood in terms of the Socratic emphasis on the care of the soul.  Committing an injustice corrupts one’s soul, and therefore committing injustice is the worst thing a person can do to himself (cf. Crito 47d-48a, Republic I 353d-354a).

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